Improve your photography!

6 Photography Tips to Improve your Skills

So you’ve mastered the basics and think you’re doing pretty well? Want to take your photography that next step? Looking for ways to improve? I have a few photography tips here which you may find useful! They’re not necessarily all specific to landscape photography but should be applicable to most types of photography.
Hopefully with some of these tips you can improve your shots and get to that next level of photography ability.

Common Landscape photography mistakes

Common Landscape Photography Mistakes

I do not claim to be a landscape photography expert but I have been doing this a while and I have learned some things over the years. As with anything we learn through our mistakes and these are some of the common mistakes that beginning landscape photographers make and how you can avoid them…
Some of these tips are aimed more at beginners while others will apply more to photographers of every level.

Enhance Rainbows with a Polarising Filter

Rainbows are somewhat of a cliché in landscape photography. However, it is undeniable how they can add interest to the scene that would otherwise be drab and perhaps boring.

Sometimes in photos they will look washed out and uninteresting- a poor representation of what you can see before you. Thankfully, there is a very easy way this can be remedied. This is through use of a circular polarising filter (CPL).

You might think that as a CPL is usually used to cut out polarised light and that rainbows consist of some degree of polarised light that using a CPL to photograph rainbows is a bad idea. However if you’ve never tried experimenting with CPLs and rainbow photography then next time you see one give it a go.

JPEG vs RAW

If you’ve just bought a DSLR or have a fancy compact camera then this is one of the questions that you might be asking. Is it better to shoot photos in the JPEG format or is it better to shoot them in RAW format?

Some people insist on shooting JPEG and others insist on RAW. What difference does it really make? Is there a benefit to be gained from shooting RAW or is JPEG the way to go?

Making that decision first involves understanding what each of the file formats mean.